Looking Back…

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Catching the puck (glove hand) – click for larger image

 

Some time ago, I went to as many of my son’s high school hockey games as I could, always bringing my first SLR camera, a Pentax Spotmatic with a 135mm f/2.8 lens. I shot Kodak Kodacolor back then, an ISO 100 film. Think about that for a minute, ISO 100.

At the time, the early DSLRs were available and way to expensive for me to own, so I set the focus on infinity, opened up the aperture to f/2.8, pushed the shutter as fast as I dared using the match meter to guess exposure and paid attention to what was happening on the ice. Those were cold rinks, but it didn’t matter much to me as I cocked the shutter wearing fingerless gloves, eye pressed to the viewfinder when I sensed something special was about to happen. I seem to recall that I used a 36 exposure roll for each game. Think about that for a moment – 36 exposures.

The result was 200 images over three seasons that eventually were scanned into DNG files and post processed using Lightroom. This photograph, from 2000, remains my favorite because of the crowd in the background and the fact that Greg was about to strip #7 of the puck and wrap around the net to score.

 

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Before the moment – click for larger image

 

Today’s good photographs are tomorrow’s great photographs.

 

Last Call

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Lightroom class begins Saturday, May 21, 2016 at 8:30am at the Corner Bakery and Cafe in Cranston, RI. Class is limited to 6 photographers.

Grab your laptop loaded with Lightroom, a cup of coffee and join other like minded photographers as you learn how to use Lightroom to organize and develop your photographs. When you are finished with this hands on workshop you are going to have the skills with Lightroom necessary to take your photography to the next level!

More information here.

Learning Lightroom

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Scott Kelby’s sample images are included in Lightroom class

Simple photo editing applications can be learned quickly, but they do not offer the features that continue to support your photographic growth. Like many photographers, I have used Picasa, Photoshop Elements, Nikon View and NX2, Apple’s iPhoto (now called simply Photos) and Aperture before discovering Lightroom. I enjoy helping other photographers learn how to use Lightroom because there is very little that it won’t do and it continues to be updated by Adobe.

Top 5 Reasons to Learn Lightroom

  1.  Designed for photographers that need both a powerful Library tool to keep track of extensive photo files as well as a powerful Develop workflow that is easy to learn.
  2. Customizable navigation and workflow tools designed to help you quickly sort out your photos for editing
  3.  Powerful global and selective editing tools fine tune your image the way you want it to look and feel.
  4. Works with Photoshop, plugins (Google/NIK, Topaz) and Lightroom Mobile (automatically add your smartphone photos to your Lightroom Library)
  5. Affordable ($10/month, including Photoshop) delivers immediate access to new features and new camera support (for less than the cost of a new lens, you can use Lightroom for the next 5 years.)

More capable software requires more learning time and the best way to learn is in a hands-on class taught by a photographer who has made it part of their workflow. In two morning classes,  the unfamiliar will become familiar and you will be importing and editing you photos using Lightroom.

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(click to display larger image)

There are a few seats left for the May Lightroomn class – limited to 6 photographers with a passion for learning. This class is designed to get you off on the right start and includes a one hour private lesson in addition to the two class sessions.

If you would like more information about this class, private lessons or distance learning, let me know (email – bob@bobkiddphoto.com).

I look forward to being your guide on this exciting journey.

 

 

Distance Learning

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The number one issue with any scheduled event can be your availability. I have a solution to offer for Lightroom photographers who might need a little help from time to time or would like to explore some specific topics when they have the time to do so.

We can share screens and let technology work for us. 

That’s right, you can work from wherever you are. All you need is a PC or Mac with an internet connection to get started.

If you would like more information, just send me a quick email – bob@bobkiddphotography.com

 

The Yin and Yang of Size

 

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(click for larger image)

 

Arguments for Bigger

Big prints are a better viewing experience than cell phones.

Big sensors render better mages than small sensors (depth of field control, detail and greater latitude of light).

Big light sources (like the sun or a seven foot umbrella) provide better light than small sources.

 

Conversely

Every image looks fabulous on your camera’s screen. Viewing them larger is always a reality check.

Large prints reveal both the beautiful evidence as well all as technical shortcomings and small distractions may no longer be small.

Sharp detail from larger sensors can be unforgiving in portraits. Less is sometimes more.

 

One photograph can tell a story.

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(click for larger image)

 

A dozen are plenty to share…

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Why Learn Lightroom?

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(click for larger image)

Top 5 Reasons to Learn Lightroom

  1.  Designed for photographers that need both a powerful Library tool to keep track of extensive photo files as well as a powerful Develop workflow that is easy to learn.
  2. Customizable navigation and workflow tools designed to help you quickly sort out your photos for editing
  3.  Powerful global and selective editing tools fine tune your image the way you want it to look and feel.
  4. Works with Photoshop, plugins (Google/NIK, Topaz) and Lightroom Mobile (automatically add your smartphone photos to your Lightroom Library)
  5. Affordable ($10/month, including Photoshop) delivers immediate access to new features and new camera support (for less than the cost of a new lens, you can use Lightroom for the next 5 years.)

Lightroom is the perfect companion software for photographers looking to make beautiful and inspiring photographs.

Lightroom class begins on May 21st at 8:30 am at the Corner Bakery and Cafe in Cranston is limited to 6 photographers with a passion for learning. This class is designed to get you off on the right start and includes a one hour private lesson in addition to the two class sessions.

More information here.

Questions?  contact Bob Kidd ~ bob@bobkiddphoto.com

 

 

 

 

 

Family Photography

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Nikon D800 with 28-300mm lens ~ bright sun, long lens (300mm), low ISO (200), fast shutter (1/640 second), f/5.6 aperture – post processing work done using Lightroom

 

Family photographs are my greatest treasures ~ marking moments in the passage of time.

 

Nikon D800 with 28-300mm lens ~ bright sun, long lens (300mm), low ISO (200), fast shutter (1/800 second), f/5.6 aperture - post processing work done using Lightroom
Nikon D800 with 28-300mm lens ~ bright sun, long lens (300mm), low ISO (200), fast shutter (1/800 second), f/5.6 aperture – post processing work done using Lightroom

You turn 10 only once.

 

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iPhone – low ISO (100), slow shutter (1/30 second), f/2.2 aperture – post processing work done using Lightroom

Experience

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“I think the key word here is experience: you can’t photograph what you don’t experience. This applies in every context around the world. You can’t re-tell a story you’ve not first heard and responded to. You can’t venture an opinion on something you’ve not had more than an outside look at.”

~ from Safari, a Monograph, David duChemin,

If you would like a free copy of this e-book, act quickly.

http://craftandvision.com/products/safari-a-monograph

Computer Running Slowly?

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Is your computer running slowly? There might be a few simple things you can do…

A fellow photographer showed me how slowly her Macbook Pro was running yesterday. A quick look revealed that the processor was plenty capable, but there was only 4 gigabytes (GB) of random access memory (RAM). While 4GB of RAM was once considered plenty, newer 64 bit operating systems (OS) want more. Yes, technology is an ever ascending escalator – 8 or even 16GB of RAM works great with 64bit OS. This is fix #1 that does not require purchasing a new computer.

Next we looked at her 500GB hard drive. WOW, it was full! She is a busy photographer and her drive was jammed packed with a ton of photos.

As a drive becomes full, data must be stored in multiple locations instead of all together. This makes both reading data (think loading your photograph file for editing) or writing data (think saving those wonderful edits you just made to the drive) a slower process because the data is stored here and here and here and, well you get the idea. An easy and inexpensive solution is to add a large external drive and move lesser used (generally older files) to the external drive.

External hard drives read and write data slower than internal drives because the data travels across a USB port. A faster solution is to replace the 500GB drive that you thought you would never fill up with a larger drive like a 1 terabyte (TB) drive. 1TB = 1,000GB. Another inexpensive solution, compared to buying a new computer.

If you use Lightroom and move your files to an external drive, remember to move the files from within Lightroom and your catalog will stay updated. Move them outside of Lightroom and you will get a bunch of these “?”. In which case you can contact me and I will help you fix this.

Making you a better photographer